Fabergé: A Life of Its Own By The Luxury Channel

The Fabergé Blue Serpent Egg, presented by Czar Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, Easter 1885. It is currently owned by Prince Albert II of Monaco.

The Fabergé Blue Serpent Egg, presented by Czar Nicholas II to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna, Easter 1885. It is currently owned by Prince Albert II of Monaco.

Not sure what to watch next at the cinema? We recommend Fabergé: A Life of Its Own, which charts the rich history behind the iconic luxury brand Fabergé, from the monumental rise of “artist jeweller” Peter Carl Fabergé in the 19th Century, to the enduring legacy of Fabergé today. The film’s director, Patrick Mark, reveals that the film is “an incredibly rich and complex story, full of emotion, mystery and wonderful characters.”

Fabergé Four Seasons Egg

Fabergé Four Seasons Egg

The film offers unprecedented access to renowned private collections, living descendants of the Fabergé family and international Fabergé experts, as well as a few other gems – for instance, the remarkable story of the Imperial Egg, long believed to be lost until its surprise discovery by a scrap metal dealer last year, before it was sold privately for an estimated $30 million. Additionally, the first Imperial Class Egg produced for 99 years – The Pearl Egg – commissioned to mark 100 years since the production of the last Imperial Egg for Czar Nicolas II, will be unveiled to audiences in exquisite close-up detail, showcasing its shell of over 3,000 diamonds and natural pearls.

The Fabergé Pearl Egg

The Fabergé Pearl Egg

The film also recounts the compelling history of the Fabergé brand, told by two of Peter Carl Fabergé’s great-granddaughters. Tatiana Fabergé recalls the dramatic upheaval of the House of Fabergé from Russia to Europe during the Russian Revolution, whilst Sarah Fabergé introduces the modern incarnations of Fabergé’s jewellery. Interviews with the world’s foremost Fabergé authorities provide fascinating details about the craftsmanship and techniques used to create extraordinary masterpieces and explain the centuries-long appeal of this iconic luxury brand.

Portrait miniatures of Czar Nicholas II & Czarina Alexandra Feodorvna in a diamond-set double frame by Fabergé, c1880s

Portrait miniatures of Czar Nicholas II & Czarina Alexandra Feodorvna in a diamond-set double frame by Fabergé, c1880s

The film has already collected the award for Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking at Newport Beach Film Festival, Best Documentary at Palm Beach International Film Festival and the Jury Award: Documentary at the Beverly Hills Film Festival. “I think that every collector in every different collecting field has a different motivation – but I think that with Fabergé there is something special,” director Patrick Mark tells us. “When the Russian Revolution arrived, the Imperial Romanov dynasty was extinguished. The Tsar and his family were brutally executed in Ekaterinburg. I think that many people are still fascinated by their tragic fate, especially the beautiful Grand Duchesses and the young Tsarevich Alexei. For many people, Fabergé objects are beautiful, mysterious and tangible reminders of that family and their vanished world.”

The Imperial Family of Russia c1914,  in a Fabergé frame.

The Imperial Family of Russia c1914, in a Fabergé frame.

With most Fabergé pieces held in private ownership or confined to a small number of museums, Fabergé: A Life of Its Own will give audiences a rare chance to experience these magnificent creations on the big screen, and the only opportunity to see two historical pieces before they return to the secrecy of their very private collections. “We were very lucky to be granted access to some of the great collections of Fabergé, including Her Majesty the Queen’s collection in London, His Serene Highness Prince Albert’s in Monte Carlo, the Hermitage in St Petersburg and many other wonderful public and private collections in USA, UK, France and Russia,” Mark reveals. “Once the curators and collectors understood that our film was a well-researched and serious enterprise, they were extremely generous with their time and knowledge. Like any collectors, they love to talk about their passion!”

The Fabergé Twelve Monogram Egg (also known as the Alexander III Portraits Egg) 1896

The Fabergé Twelve Monogram Egg (also known as the Alexander III Portraits Egg) 1896

For more information, go to www.faberge.com. Fabergé: A Life of Its Own will be released in Picturehouse and selected independent cinemas throughout July and August. For further screening information, visit www.fabergefilm.com. See the film trailer below: